“The character of love is composed of two parts: the character for heart embraced by acceptance.” - Basara, Tamura Yumi

“The character of love is composed of two parts: the character for heart embraced by acceptance.” - Basara, Tamura Yumi

bobbycaputo:

Empty Silent London by Photographer Corrado Chiozzi Taken on Christmas Day, The Only Day of the Year Where the Capital Is Silent

explore-blog:

Happy 100th birthday, Hedy Lamarr! Once known as “the most beautiful woman in the world,” this remarkable Hollywood-star-turned-inventor created a revolutionary technology for remote-controlling torpedoes that paved the way for bluetooth and wifi. 

explore-blog:

Happy 100th birthday, Hedy Lamarr! Once known as “the most beautiful woman in the world,” this remarkable Hollywood-star-turned-inventor created a revolutionary technology for remote-controlling torpedoes that paved the way for bluetooth and wifi

literaryjukebox:

Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less.

Marie Curie (November 7, 1867—July 4, 1934) cited in Our Precarious Habitat

Song: “Darlin’ Do Not Fear” by Brett Dennen

iTunes :: Amazon :: Back to Brain Pickings

explore-blog:

Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman, author of the indispensible Thinking, Fast and Slow, cracks open the Pandora’s box of how our “intuition” deceives us

explore-blog:

Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman, author of the indispensible Thinking, Fast and Slow, cracks open the Pandora’s box of how our “intuition” deceives us

→ A Conversation with Dr. Josh Baron : Banyan Family Business Advisors

"It’s a real mistake to think that philanthropy has to be pure. It’s not pure – I can tell you that from having worked on all sides of the equation from start-up social enterprises to large organizations to big foundations to small foundations to individual philanthropists to work with families. But the fact that you have multiple motives doesn’t at all mean that you don’t also have a real heartfelt desire to make a difference. And if you treat philanthropy as something that we only do for pure motives to give something back to society, then you’re limiting the potential impact of it.

Sometimes people get embarrassed about being self-interested about philanthropy, but to me there’s no right or wrong motivation, so long as you get there; that’s what really matters. I think one might even argue that if your giving is in your self-interest, then you’re going to give more and be more effective with it than someone who’s just doing it because he or she has a general desire to give back to society, or because they want to be recognized in the community. Those are very honorable motivations; they truly are. But sometimes there can be other much more pragmatic motivations, if you will, and that is good, too. The best of us are altruistic only a small part of the time; most of our time and energy focuses on things that somehow benefit ourselves. If we hope to harness the full potential that family companies bring as an engine for change, then we must be clear about the benefits that giving brings to people beyond the psychic rewards. It’s far better, and more sustainable, to acknowledge our interests rather than to give only when a feeling of altruism sweeps over us.”

explore-blog:

Happy birthday, Reconstructionist Eleanor Roosevelt!

"I think people misunderstand, sometimes, the difference between “empathy” and “sympathy”, and this is getting us in trouble. Sympathy is closer to pity. Empathy, which is essential for being human, means that you can imagine yourself in some else’s situation, good or bad. And feeling *real* empathy, even empathy with “the enemy”, with the bottom of the barrel of humanity, with the suicide bombers, with the child molesters, with the Hitlers and the Osamas, is necessary. If you, as a human being, can’t stop and try to imagine what sort of pain and agony and darkness must have descended upon these people to twist them up so badly, you have no roadmap to untwist the circumstances under which they were created. … There can be no limit to empathy. … If you can’t go the final mile, you’re not there yet."
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Poignant meditation on empathy by Amanda Palmer, who knows a thing or two about the terrifying joy of sharing your work online.

Pair with philosopher Judith Butler on how reading and the humanities make us more empathetic and philosopher Roman Krznaric on empathy and social change.

(via explore-blog)

ianbrooks:

Quotable Arts by Evan Robertson / Obvious State

High quality giclée prints available at etsy. Distilling literary quotes from a handful of the masters down to a single graphic representation, Evan captures the raw concept of the sentence and makes it damn purty to look at as well.

(via: fab)

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